National Latina Business Women Association

Latinas are about half of the 60 million Latinos in the country and 18 percent of all women in the U.S. They have held a number of local, state and federal offices even though they are underrepresented at all levels, including in Cabinet-level appointments. She is the President of the Board of the Santa Ana College Foundation and serves on the board of the Orange County Children Therapeutic Arts Center.

Donors of the H100 Latina Giving Circle have the opportunity to give, connect and participate in the grant making process with a range of opportunities to review, vet and vote on a selection of grantees. Of the 73 women serving in statewide elective executive offices, six are Latina.

This has been explained by the tendency for Hispanic women to continue breastfeeding for a longer amount of time. Latinx gives people a way to avoid choosing a gender for a group or an unknown individual, much like using singular “they” avoids the choice between “he” or “she” in English. Both are gaining steam in a time when America is rethinking gender and whatever boundaries might come with it. Katy Steinmetz is a TIME correspondent in San Francisco covering tech, politics, culture, language . Yes, the United States has come a long way since the days when women could not legally vote and were barred from legitimate employment – but the reminder of this wage gap demonstrates that our lawmakers still have much to do to ensure equality for all women in America.

However, Latina entrepreneurship has grown immensely since the start of the 21st century. In 2011, 788,000 Latinas ran their own businesses, representing a 46% increase from 2006. Comparatively, female business owners as a whole only increased by 20% during this same time period. Immigration to the United States offers new economic prospects for Latina women.

Political activist César Chávez and novelist José Antonio Villarreal are famous Chicanos. In northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, there is a large portion of Hispanics who trace their ancestry to Spanish settlers of the late 16th century through the 17th century. People from this background often self-identify as “Hispanos”, “Spanish” or “Hispanic”. Many of these settlers also intermarried with local Amerindians, creating a Mestizo population. Likewise, southern Louisiana is home to communities of people of Canary Islands descent, known as Isleños, in addition to other people of Spanish ancestry.

Although a minimum wage hike wouldn’t fully solve the problem, it is a step in the right direction. NWLC reports that Latinas who work full-time, year-round jobs and also have a bachelor’s degree generally only earn about $52,037 per year. A White, non-Hispanic man with only an associate’s degree, on the other hand, generally makes $54,620. This comparison offers a bleak perspective of the position that Latina women are in – that despite having more education, some Latina women still earn lower wages and must work longer to make the same amount of money. This has disastrous consequences for the Latino community by denying them monetary resources that would ultimately benefit them.

District Court for the District of Columbia rejected Colon’s petition for a writ of mandamus directing the Secretary of State to approve a Certificate of Loss of Nationality in the case because the plaintiff wanted to retain one of the primary benefits of U.S. citizenship while claiming he was not a U.S. citizen. The Puerto Rico Supreme Court affirmed that Puerto Rican citizenship identifies the persons that have it as integral members of the Puerto Rican community, saying this is the integral juridical tie between the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and their citizens. http://dsis.betoo.si/probably-the-most-overlooked-solution-for-puerto-rico-women/ The court stated that “Puerto Rican political community is defined better by the citizenship of Puerto Rico than by US citizenship. That is a fact not subject to historical rectifications and a reality which no law can change.” In 1994, Puerto Rican activist Juan Mari Brás flew to Venezuela and renounced his US citizenship before a consular agent in the US Embassy in Caracas. Mari Brás, through his renunciation of U.S. citizenship, sought to redefine Section VII as a source of law that recognized a Puerto Rican nationality separate from that of the United States.

While Latinas have a rich history of leadership in their communities, they are underrepresented in all levels of government. From 2007 to 2012, the share of Latina women earning at or below minimum wage more than tripled. Latina women make 88 percent of their male counterparts’ annual full-time earnings.

She is also on the Advisory Board of the National Latina Business-Women Association-Inland Empire Chapter, the Orange County Community Housing Corporation, the Affordable Housing Clearing House, the National Hispanic Business-Women Association, the Hispanic Education Endowment Fund, and the Orange County Human Relations. She has been the recipient of many awards throughout her professional career. Rossina joined Union Bank in 1981, and during her tenure, she has served in various positions in small business lending, Special Assets management and Multicultural Markets. Prior to 2020, Rossina managed the charitable contributions and community outreach in Orange County, San Diego and the Inland Empire; thus, making her familiar with the issues affecting most markets in Southern California. Rossina Gallegos facilitates and manages the charitable contribution and the Foundation grant making for Los Angeles and Orange County.

The National Women’s Law Center estimates that the gender wage gap amounts to a loss of $26,095 a year. That amount can mean a lot to a working family attempting to pay its bills, put food on the table, and provide for their children. NWLC also estimates that over the course of a 40-year career, with the current wage gap, the average Latina would lose over a million dollars in wages. Wage gaps also harm the individuality of working Latinas and limit their social and economic mobility. The academy will provide a series of informational sessions on various topics that will better prepare women entering the world of entrepreneurship.

She volunteers her time to pro bono legal clinics, as well as nonprofit organizations whose mission is to support underrepresented individuals in legal and non-legal matters. She hosts Lunes Legal, a weekly Facebook Live show in Spanish to educate the community on family law and estate Planning. In 2017, #LatinaGeeks designed the “Latinas Learn to Code” program to help bridge the gender gap in the tech programming industry by providing an introduction to the foundations of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript — the three building blocks of the web.

  • This also results in non-Iberian surnames being more common in central Mexico, especially in the country’s capital and in the state of Jalisco.
  • An Arab Mexican is a Mexican citizen of Arabic-speaking origin who can be of various ancestral origins.
  • The vast majority of 450,000 Mexicans who have at least partial Arab descent trace their ancestry to what is now Lebanon and Syria.
  • The 2003 General Law of Linguistic Rights of the Indigenous Peoples recognizes 62 indigenous languages as “national languages” which have the same validity as Spanish in all territories in which they are spoken.

A 2019 study, examining the comparatively better health of foreign-born American Hispanics, challenged the hypothesis that a stronger orientation toward the family contributed to this advantage. Some scholars have suggested that the Latino mortality advantage is likely to disappear due to the higher rates of obesity and diabetes among Latinos relative to non-Hispanic whites, although lower rates of smoking (and thus smoking-attributable mortality) among Latinos may counteract this to some extent. Persons of Mexican heritage represent the bulk of the US Hispanic/Latino population.

The term “Arab Mexican” may include ethnic groups that do not in fact identify as Arab. An Arab Mexican is a Mexican citizen of Arabic-speaking origin who can be of various ancestral origins. The vast majority of 450,000 Mexicans who have at least partial Arab descent trace their ancestry to what is now Lebanon and Syria. The 2003 General Law of Linguistic Rights of the Indigenous Peoples recognizes 62 indigenous languages as “national languages” which have the same validity as Spanish in all territories in which they are spoken.

Migration History

The differences in attitudes are due to the diverging goals of Spanish-language and English-language media. The effect of using Spanish-language media serves to promote a sense of group consciousness among Latinos by reinforcing roots in Latin America and the commonalities among Latinos of varying national origin. With 40% of Hispanic and Latino Americans being immigrants, and with many of the 60% who are U.S.-born being the children or grandchildren of immigrants, bilingualism is the norm in the community at large.

Here are just seven of the damaging lies about Latina women common in American society today. If you were to accept everything you heard about Latinas, you might think they were scheming and hypersexual, yet socially conservative women whose “equal educational opportunities” and “competitive purchasing power” signify their “arrival.” I spent two years living fully nomadic, mostly traveling solo, and meeting people through social media. because now when i wanted to visit her in mexico she cut off all contact with me, a week ago, and i tried calling her and writing but i get no response. Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, French, Italians, Brazilians, Spaniards, Belgians, French Canadians, Portuguese, Filipinos, Columbians, Argentianians, Haitians, Dominicans, Romainians, Chileans, Peruvians and other South and Central Americans are Latins because the language is rooted in Latin.

Currently, there are limited resources for Latina immigrants in the United States. As explained in Motivations of Immigration, many women come to the United States for a better education, among other factors. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research explains the workings of organizations aimed to support the struggles of Latina immigrants.

Both collective bargaining and banning salary history seek to balance information asymmetries that benefit employers. The intersectional structural barriers faced by Hispanic women that lead to reduced wages affect both their own lifetime earnings, as well as the economic security of their families.

At home, at least 69% of all Hispanics over the age of five are bilingual in English and Spanish, whereas up to 22% are monolingual English-speakers, and 9% are monolingual Spanish speakers. Another 0.4% speak a language other than English and Spanish at home. The geographic, political, social, economic and racial diversity of Hispanic and Latino Americans makes all Hispanics very different depending on their family heritage and/or national origin. Yet several features tend to unite Hispanics from these diverse backgrounds. According to a 2013 study, Mexican women who have the highest uninsured rate (54.6%) as compared to other immigrants (26.2%), blacks (22.5%) and non-Hispanic white (13.9%).

Hundreds of Latina women will gather Saturday to network, learn about growing their small business and discuss the unique challenges they face in their homes and communities at the Minnesota Latina Women’s Expo at Bloomington City Hall. The fifth-annual conference aims to bolster Hispanic women on the state’s business scene.